Here at Flowrider we take Health very seriously Here is an interpretation of what we test for

All the testing listed below is done through Paw Prints Genetics (please click on Paw Prints).

 

 

 Congenital hypothyroidism with goiter (CHG) is an inherited disease affecting dogs. Affected dogs lack an Enzyme that is important in the production of thyroid hormone which is necessary for the normal development and metabolism of dogs. At 3-8 weeks of age, dogs with CHG are generally noted to have reduced movement and to be small when compared to their littermates. Enlarged thyroid glands (goiter) are often noticeable as a swelling on the neck. Affected puppies exhibit dwarfism with short legs, large heads, and fluffy hair coats absent of guard hairs. In addition, affected dogs develop a wide variety of neurological and neuromuscular deficits. The condition progresses to failure to thrive and death. Most symptoms can be prevented or will regress if the condition is diagnosed early and affected dogs are treated with thyroid hormone medication. However, the thyroid glands may continue to enlarge over time despite treatment and can eventually obstruct the dog’s airway.Teddy Roosevelt terrier is included as a breed susceptible to congenital hypothyroidism with goiter (terrier type) because of its close relatedness to the rat terrier breed, which is known to develop this disease due to Mutation of the TPO gene. The frequency of the causal mutation in the general Teddy Roosevelt terrier population is unknown.

 

 

Degenerative Myelopathy is an inherited neurologic disorder caused by a Mutation of the SOD1 gene in dogs. This mutation is found in many breeds of dog, though it is not clear for some breeds whether all dogs carrying two copies of the mutation will develop the disease. The variable presentation between breeds suggests that there are environmental or other genetic factors responsible for modifying disease expression. The average age of onset for dogs with degenerative myelopathy is approximately nine years of age. The disease affects the White Mattertissue of the spinal cord and is considered the canine equivalent to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease) found in humans. Affected dogs usually present in adulthood with gradual muscle Atrophy and loss of coordination typically beginning in the hind limbs due to degeneration of the nerves. The condition is not typically painful for the dog, but will progress until the dog is no longer able to walk. The gait of dogs affected with degenerative myelopathy can be difficult to distinguish from the gait of dogs with hip dysplasia, arthritis of other joints of the hind limbs, or intervertebral disc disease. Late in the progression of disease, dogs may lose fecal and urinary continence and the forelimbs may be affected. Affected dogs may fully lose the ability to walk 6 months to 2 years after the onset of symptoms. Affected small breed dogs, such as the Teddy Roosevelt terrier, often progress more slowly than affected large breed dogs and owners may postpone euthanasia until the dog is paraplegic. Teddy Roosevelt terrier is included as a breed susceptible to degenerative myelopathy because of its close relatedness to the rat terrier breed, which is known to develop this disease due to Mutation of the SOD1 gene. The frequency of the causal mutation in the general Teddy Roosevelt terrier population is unknown.

Primary Lens Luxation is an inherited abnormality of the eye affecting Teddy Roosevelt Terriers. It is characterized by dislocation of the lens in the eye due to the breakage of the ligaments (called zonules) that hold the lens in place. The age of onset is variable depending on whether a dog has one or two copies of the Mutation, but affected dogs typically present between 2 to 8 years of age with sudden signs of eye irritation. Symptoms of lens luxation include excessive blinking, squinting and tearing of the eye. Dislocation of the lens can occur in both the forward and backward position within the eye, but dislocation in the forward position is more common and serious. If not treated immediately, lens dislocation can lead to Glaucoma and vision loss. 

Canine multiple system degeneration (Kerry blue terrier type) is a progressive inherited neurological disease affecting Kerry blue terriers. Affected dogs present at 3 to 6 months of age with tremors, abnormal gait and poor balance. Dogs gradually progress to severe gait abnormalities and balance issues, frequent falling, abnormal body posture, abnormal eye movement and eventually, are unable to move. Dogs continue to show normal mental awareness and social behavior despite movement disturbances. Most dogs die due to disease complications or are humanely euthanized by 2 years of age.

Coagulation factor VII deficiency is an inherited bleeding disorder affecting dogs. Factor VII is an essential protein needed for normal blood clotting. Deficiency of this factor most commonly results in a mild bleeding disorder. An affected dog may bruise easily, have frequent nosebleeds, and exhibit prolonged bleeding after surgery or trauma. In rare cases, the bleeding may be severe. Due to the mild nature of this disorder, affected dogs may not be identified until a surgery is performed or trauma occurs at which time excessive bleeding is noted. Veterinarians performing surgery on dogs that are known to have coagulation factor VII deficiency should have ready access to blood banked for transfusions. Most dogs with this condition will have a normal lifespan despite increased blood clotting times.

Dilated cardiomyopathy is an inherited disorder of the heart affecting several breeds of dog. This disease shows Incomplete Penetrance, meaning that not all dogs at risk (those with one or two copies of the Mutation) will develop the disease. In affected dogs, the heart muscle is weak and the chambers become dilated with thin walls. These enlarged hearts have poor contractility and are prone to arrhythmias. Affected dogs present with clinical signs of poor heart function between 1 to 8 years of age. Affected dogs develop clinical signs as they age ranging from mild exercise intolerance to sudden death or congestive heart failure. Signs of heart disease include exercise intolerance, fatigue, coughing, difficulty breathing, rapid breathing, fainting and sudden death. Affected dogs that don’t die suddenly from arrhythmias usually die from congestive heart failure around 7 years of age. Different disease genes and environmental factors play a role the development of dilated cardiomyopathy in dogs. Therefore, not all dogs with this disease will have the same genetic mutation.

*NOTE: The PDK4 gene mutation was originally identified in the Doberman pinscher and has only been associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in this breed. Though this mutation has been identified in several other breeds, including those known to develop dilated cardiomyopathy, a correlation between this mutation and dilated cardiomyopathy has not been established for these breeds. For this reason, the most cautious medical approach for any dog inheriting the PDK4 gene mutation would be to make all health and breeding decisions based upon cardiac exam results and recommendations from a board certified veterinary cardiologist. Dogs from breeds other than the Doberman pinscher that have been found to have inherited this mutation should not be removed from breeding programs based upon the results of this genetic test alone.

Hyperuricosuria is an inherited condition of the urinary system affecting several breeds of dog. The SLC2A9 gene codes for a protein that allows the kidneys to transport uric acid from the urine. Dogs with mutations in both copies of the SLC2A9 gene are predisposed to have elevated levels of uric acid in the urine, hence the name hyperuricosuria. Uric acid can form crystals and/or stones (uroliths) in the urinary tract. Dogs with hyperuricosuria most commonly present with symptoms of recurrent urinary tract inflammation, which include frequent urination, blood in the urine, and straining to urinate. They may also have loss of appetite, lethargy, weakness, vomiting and pain. Urinary stones in the bladder can cause urinary tract infections or more seriously, blockage of the Urethra. Both male and female dogs can be affected, but obstruction of urine flow is more common in males due to differences in anatomy. Although an x-ray can be used to exclude other types of stones, urate stones cannot typically be seen using x-rays and must be evaluated by ultrasound. Not all dogs with mutations in both copies of the SLC2A9 gene will have symptoms of disease, though they will have increased uric acid excretion in the urine.

Late-onset Ataxia is an inherited neurologic disease affecting dogs. Dogs with this disease present with incoordination and loss of balance between 6 to 12 months of age. The disease is progressive with affected dogs developing a “prancing” gait and often falling. With time dogs have difficulty standing and are usually euthanized by 2 years of age due to a poor quality of life.

Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) VII (Brazilian terrier type) is an inherited Lysosomal Storage Disorder affecting dogs. Affected dogs have insufficient activity of the Enzyme beta-glucuronidase, which is responsible for breaking down glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). GAGs are an important component of Connective Tissue. In affected dogs there is an accumulation of breakdown products in cells causing abnormal growth and function of various different organ systems. Clinical signs of MPS VII (Brazilian terrier type) are most commonly associated with accumulations in the bones and joints. Therefore, affected dogs typically present between 1 to 4 weeks of age with symptoms of bone and joint disease. Affected puppies have disproportionally large heads with short muzzles, broad faces and domed skulls. Other skeletal deformities include joint laxity and deformed, crooked legs resulting in an inability to walk. Affected puppies are smaller than their normal littermates and exhibit a failure to thrive. Affected dogs die on their own or are euthanized within the first 5 weeks of life.

Severe combined immunodeficiency (terrier type) is an inherited disease affecting dogs. Affected dogs are unable to produce a protein important for proper immune function, predisposing them to severe recurrent or chronic bacterial, viral and fungal infections. Affected dogs often present with symptoms of disease around 12 to 14 weeks of age including failure to thrive, poor growth, weight loss, lethargy, diarrhea, vomiting and lack of palpable lymph nodes. Affected dogs may also present with active respiratory, skin, eye or ear infections. Puppies may die shortly after vaccination with modified live vaccines. Affected dogs die within 4 months of age.

Spinocerebellar Ataxia is an early onset, inherited neurologic disease affecting dogs. Dogs with this disease present with incoordination and loss of balance between 2 to 6 months of age. The disease is progressive with affected dogs developing a “prancing” gait and often falling. With this form of ataxia dogs may also have episodes of muscle twitching and rigidity that can appear like seizures but dogs are aware of their surroundings during these attacks. The episodes of muscle twitching get worse with age and dogs are at risk of overheating. Affected dogs can also experience true epileptic seizures. Dogs with spinocerebellar ataxia are usually euthanized by 2 years of age due to a poor quality of life.

Von Willebrand’s disease type I (VWDI) is an inherited bleeding disorder affecting many breeds of dog. Dogs affected with VWDI have less than half of the normal level of von Willebrand coagulation factor (vWf), which is an essential protein needed for normal blood clotting. There is variability in the amount of vWf such that not all dogs with two copies of the Mutation are equally affected. Dogs that have less than 35% of the normal amount of vWf generally have mild to moderate signs of a bleeding disorder. Affected dogs may bruise easily, have frequent nosebleeds, bleed from the mouth when juvenile teeth are lost, and experience prolonged bleeding after surgery or trauma. Less often, the bleeding may be severe enough to cause death. Due to the variable severity of the disorder, affected dogs may not be identified until a surgery is performed or trauma occurs at which time excessive bleeding is noted. Veterinarians performing surgery on known affected dogs should have ready access to blood banked for transfusions. Most dogs will have a normal lifespan with this condition despite increased blood clotting times.

OFA TESTING 

(click to go to link)

Hips and Elbows will be done, on all our breeding stock, once they reach the age of 24 months. 

Patellar Luxation will be done, on all our breeding stock, once they reach the age of 12 months.

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